Fat Free Food

Pamela Stuppy: Defining food packaging claims

Many consumers have health concerns that benefit from understanding claims made on food packaging. These are often part of the marketing of a food product so do not appear on the “Nutrition Facts” section of the label. The terms you may see are definitions of the relative amounts of a particular component of the food based on what is noted as the serving size. Examples would include calories, fat, saturated fat, cholesterol, sodium, sugar, and fiber.With regard to calories, the terms you might see would be “calorie free”, “low calorie”, or “reduced calorie”. The FDA approved definition of “calorie free”…
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A free class for better health

What type of medicine requires no prescription, no pharmacy, and no clinical trials?Food.While food is not actually a drug, it certainly acts like medicine in the way it enhances health and helps prevent disease.Eating sensibly can contribute immensely to managing weight and preventing the number one killer in the United States – heart disease. One great way to do that is through the Food is Medicine program that was developed by renowned research dietitian Mary Flynn, PhD, RD, LDN, and that I teach in a class that is free of charge to the community. Another excellent option is the DASH…
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10 Food Substitutes for the Military Diet

The military diet is a calorie-restricted fad diet that claims to help you lose 10 pounds (4.5 kg) in a week. It offers detailed instructions on what, when, and how much to eat. Its primary foods include toast, canned tuna, eggs, apples, bananas, cheese, cottage cheese, saltine crackers, hot dogs, vanilla ice cream, peanut butter, tea, coffee, and grapefruit.However, due to aversions, sensitivities, medical reasons, and dietary or religious practices, some people don’t eat some of these foods. Therefore, you may be curious about food swaps that are permitted on this diet.Here are 10 common food substitutions on the military…
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Kraft discontinues fat free mayo

Photo: milanfoto (Getty Images)If you’re someone who “watches what you eat,” it’s important not to deny yourself the foods you crave by replacing them with a pale imitation of what you actually desire. Speaking from experience, that tactic only builds resentment toward the lower-calorie or otherwise “healthier” alternatives, rather than leaving you feeling satisfied with the swap. Nothing illustrates the gulf between regular and fat-free foods better than mayonnaise, a condiment that exists to add fattiness to food but whose fat-free iteration has somehow been allowed to proliferate for the last several decades. Today, Kraft Mayo says no more. Today,…
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